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Tech News In Brief

Tech News for the week to come

Tech News from around the web, in case you missed it: 08/10/2018

1

Watch: Scott Galloway’s provocative predictions on Amazon, Walmart and the future of retail

Recode

Scott Galloway, NYU Stern School of Business professor and future co-host of our new Pivot podcast, kicked off Recode’s Code Commerce conference this week in New York with a wide-ranging and humorous presentation.

Read here.

 

2

Google Exposed User Data, Feared Repercussions of Disclosing to Public

Wall Street Journal

Google opted not to disclose to users its discovery of a bug that gave outside developers access to private data. It found no evidence of misuse.

Read here.

 

3

Facebook Pushes Into Africa

Wall Street Journal

Social media giant helps connect remote parts of Uganda to internet, after past efforts to widen access in developing world drew criticism

Read here.

 

4

Artificial Intelligence Hits African Companies

The Africa Report

Fear not, robots will not be stealing Africa’s jobs any time soon. It has been a mantra of capitalism since the beginning: using a tractor boosts your yield compared to using a spade. Your factory can multiply your output. Technology boosts productivity. 

Read here.

 

5

Television: Netflix Doesn’t Hold All the Aces

The Africa Report

The video-streaming behemoth launched its services in every African country in January. Are local providers running scared? Not in the least.

Read here.

 

6

Thumbs down: how the video games industry is battling Brexit

The Guardian

From dystopian games to organised campaigns, the industry’s stance on the EU is clear. But is it too little too late?

Read here.

 

7

With Project XCloud, Xbox Wants to Bring Gaming Anywhere You Are

Wired

Cloud gaming is a long-held dream, but Xbox is harnessing the power of Microsoft to make it happen—for real this time.

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8

Some Amazon Workers Fear They’ll Earn Less Even With a $15 Minimum Wage

Wired

When Amazon announced Tuesday that it was raising its minimum wage to $15 an hour for all employees, even vocal critics of its labor practices like Senator Bernie Sanders praised the company. But some Amazon workers, including one who spoke with WIRED, think they will earn less under the new policy—even though they are receiving an hourly raise.

Read here.

 

9

The Morning Download: JPMorgan Chase Makes Coding Literacy a Requirement

Wall Street Journal

Good day, CIOs. If every company is a technology company, is every employee a technologist? JPMorgan Chase & Co. may think so. This year all analysts joining its asset management division were required to take mandatory training in Python code, the FT reports. So far, a third of the bank's analysts and associates have taken a coding program, the FT says.

Read here.

 

10

Tech Workers Now Want to Know: What Are We Building This For?

New York Times

Jack Poulson, a Google research scientist, recently became alarmed by reports that the company was developing a search engine for China that would censor content on behalf of the government.

Read here.

 

11

One of the World's 7,000 Languages Dies Every Three Months. Can Apps Help Save Them?

Time

Like his ancestors, 65-year-old Clayton Long spent his childhood immersed in Navajo culture, greeting fellow clan members with old, breathful Navajo words like “Yá’át’ééh.” Then he was sent to an English-only boarding school where his native language, also known as Diné, was banned. He vowed that he would help to preserve it after he left, work he has done for about three decades as a teacher. This week, he’s entering new territory on that mission: the app store.

Read here.

 

12

Bumble to expand to India with the help of actress Priyanka Chopra

CNN

Bumble is the latest online dating app to compete for the hearts of women in India.

Read here.

 

13

Tencent has pumped billions into 300 companies. Here's what it's buying

CNN

WeChat owner Tencent is more than just one of the world's biggest internet companies, it's also a major investor in businesses around the globe.

Read here.

 

14

Chinese tech IPOs have had a blowout year. The wave may have peaked

CNN

Chinese tech companies have had a bumper year raising money from investors, but there are signs that the good times may be coming to an end.

Read here.

 

15

Apple and Amazon deny China hack claims

BBC

A report alleging that Apple and Amazon had data stolen by Chinese spies has been strongly disputed by both tech firms.

Read here.

 

16

Coding In a Conflict Zone

BBC

Gaza Sky Geeks, a tech hub started by Google and the NGO, Mercy Corps, teaches coding and has an outsourcing agency.

Read here.

 

17

Microsoft Dealmaker Peggy Johnson Reveals the Story Behind the Company's Transformation

Time

For Peggy Johnson, Microsoft’s Executive Vice President of Business Development, the transformation that has taken place at her company over the past few years has been all about a changing mindset.

Read here.

 

18

Behold: The Oculus Quest

The Week

Each week, we spotlight a cool innovation recommended by some of the industry's top tech writers. This week's pick is the first stand-alone VR gaming device.

Read here.

 

19

Facebook Launches Video Device, Says Privacy is 'Very, Very, Very Important'

Bloomberg

Facebook Inc. wants you to buy its new video chat devices for your home, complete with cameras that track movement. That sounds like a lot to ask for a social-media company mired in privacy scandals. But Facebook has crafted its Portal gadgets, launched Monday, to be as un-creepy as possible.

Read here.

 

20

Can social media make you poorer?

The Week

Here are three of the week's top pieces of financial advice, gathered from around the web.

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21

The mobile government loudspeaker in your pocket

The Week

Today at 2:18 p.m., my phone let out a banshee screech as it received the first ever Presidential Alert: "THIS IS A TEST of the National Wireless Emergency Alert System. No action is needed." On my iPhone, it looked and sounded like a flood or AMBER Alert, and joined a chorus of phones going off around me in the newsroom. It was the alarm heard 'round the nation. And it had been sent by the president himself.

Read here.

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